COVID Response-New Brunswick

The Office of the Provost has developed several programs to support faculty and students impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

COVID Impact on Scholarly Productivity Faculty Grant Program: A collaborative response by New Brunswick Provost and Academic Units

The COVID-19 Pandemic has adversely impacted faculty across institutions of higher education. The pandemic has created conditions where families prioritize their caregiving responsibilities ahead of making progress towards their academic career goals. Numerous articles about the COVID-impact on the academy points to the disproportionate adverse impact on women. For example, Jillian Kramer, author of "The Virus Moved Female Faculty to the Brink. Will Universities Help?” points to the widening of gender-based performance gaps that disproportionately impact women (New York Times, October 6, 2020, retrieved on March 22, https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/06/science/covid-universities-women.html). The university has provided an institutional response that addresses the COVID adjustments faculty can use, including the extension of the probationary period, exclusion of teaching evaluations from their reappointment and/or tenure packets, and guidance for special notification in the tenure promotion process to mention a few. However, the Chancellor/Provost office, in partnership with academic deans, seeks to provide additional support that will allow faculty to advance their scholarly productivity. Through this program, tenure-track (TT) and non-tenure-track (NTT), early-career faculty can seek funding to support their teaching release or student assistance or training to support scholarly activities as determined to be appropriate by their dean.

Application Process
Applicants will be a junior or early mid-career Tenure Track/Non-Tenure Track (TT/NTT) faculty whose scholarly productivity has been adversely impacted by COVID. Applicants will be required to provide a clear plan detailing how the fellowship will lead to increased scholarly productivity. Plans should include both external and internal strategies for increasing productivity. For example, external elements may consist of university or national training series or formal or informal writing groups. Internal aspects should include schedules, milestones, and goals. Applicants will also be required to describe tangible outcomes that will reflect their desired results (e.g., number of pages drafted, number of article submissions, number of grant proposals). Given the limited availability of funds, junior faculty members who are primarily responsible for caregiving duties in their families will be prioritized, as will any other relevant information the applicant provides.

Award Amounts

  • Award amounts will vary according to demonstrated need and not exceed a total of
  • $5000.00.
  • Funds will be available starting July 1, 2021, and used by June 30, 2022.

Applications should be submitted to your dean's office by May 1, 2021, and accompanied by the following:

  • A brief statement of COVID impact on scholarly productivity
  • A plan detailing how the fellowship will lead to increased scholarly productivity:
    • Include external plans (e.x. university or national training series, formal or informal writing groups) and/or internal plans (e.x. time schedules, milestones, and goals).
    • How will the money be used? (e.x. provide cost for activities-training, release time, research support, etc.). Please note course release requests should not exceed the cost for PTL hire to cover the course.
    • Describe tangible outcomes that reflect goal achievement (e.g., number of pages drafted, number of article submissions, number of grant proposals).
    • A report on accomplishments will be due at the end of the cycle.
  • Deans’ recommendations will be forwarded to the Provost’s Office for final approval.
  • Applicants will be notified by the deans of the academic units.

Given the limited availability of funds, junior faculty members who are primarily responsible for caregiving duties in their families will be prioritized. Please contact your dean’s office for more information.

Provost’s Teaching Fellows Program

The Provost’s Office has collaborated with the Center for Teaching Advancement and Assessment Research (CTAAR) to create the Provost’s Teaching Fellows Program to support pedagogical innovation to improve student learning outcomes. Fellows will define their own goals for course redesign using best practices as supported by teaching and learning scholarship. These practices may include flipping classroom instruction, implementing practices to support inclusive learning environments, designing greater active learning classroom components, incorporating more personalized learning pathways, and developing alternative grading schemes. The program will include full cohort sessions to share goals and build networks, as well as small group consultations focusing on different elements of course redesign. Fellows will have the opportunity to engage in reflective and research-driven change and to choose from a menu of strategies that will enhance learning in their courses.

Fellows were selected based on nominations from their deans and their expressed interest in exploring and adopting new pedagogical approaches for their courses. In recognition of participation in the program, Fellows will receive a research stipend of $2,000.

Preliminary Schedule

  • April and May: Full-cohort kick-off and overview sessions
  • May through July: Small group consultations
  • August: Redesign plan presentations
  • September through March: Follow up and evaluation

2021-22 Cohort of Provost’s Teaching Fellows

  • Joseph Agresta, Rutgers Business School
  • Christy Beal, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Steven Brechin, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Brian Dashew, Graduate School of Education
  • Jeff Dowd, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Sophia Fu, School of Communication and Information
  • Anna Hausmann, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences
  • Barry Jesse, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences
  • Anne Keating, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Michael J. McDonough, Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy
  • Xenia Morin, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences
  • Ines Rauschenbach, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences
  • Kathy Shoemaker, Graduate School of Education
  • Kristen Springer, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Dan Stern Cardinale, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Paul Takhistov, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences
  • Gregg Transue, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Maria Venetis, School of Communication and Information
  • Kristen Wallentinsen, Mason Gross School of the Arts
  • Matthew Weber, School of Communication and Information
  • Elin Wicks, School of Engineering
  • Zhimin Xi, School of Engineering
  • Calvin Yu, School of Arts and Sciences
  • Aparna Zama, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences